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Religion und 1.Weltkrieg – Research On Religion

Religion und 1.Weltkrieg –  Research On Religion

Philip Jenkins on Religion & World War I – Research On Religion

Was “The Great War” a holy war? Noted historian Philip Jenkins, Distinguished Professor of History at Baylor University, joins us to discuss the spiritual overtones and undertones of World War I and that conflict’s impact on our contemporary religious landscape. While most historians have focused on secular and materialist explanations for the war’s outbreak and progression, Prof. Jenkins points out the blind spot his profession has had to the spiritual dimensions of the “war to end all wars.”    ….

Our conversation then turns to the war itself and how religious language and imagery was used.  We look at the constant discussion of angels and “God’s guiding hand,” perhaps best represented by the story of the Angel of Mons and how that developed.  Philip points out how a major German offensive was named Operation Michael, after the biblical archangel.  The art of the time was replete with winged women or war heroes, as well as crucifixion scenes that depicted fallen soldiers.  We also examine apocalyptic imagery and the recurrence of Armageddon themes, particularly with the British successfully taking the Holy Land in the Battle of Meggido.  Philip also explains that even though such religious depictions ran across all economic classes and were quite popular, political and church leaders tried at times to tamp it down for a variety of sensitivities.  For example, calling the war a “crusade” was seen as counter-productive in attempting to woo Muslim soldiers into fighting for the Allies. – …….

See more at: http://www.researchonreligion.org/historical-topics/philip-jenkins-on-religion-world-war-i#sthash.n92EK41S.dpuf

Our conversation then turns to the war itself and how religious language and imagery was used.  We look at the constant discussion of angels and “God’s guiding hand,” perhaps best represented by the story of the Angel of Mons and how that developed.  Philip points out how a major German offensive was named Operation Michael, after the biblical archangel.  The art of the time was replete with winged women or war heroes, as well as crucifixion scenes that depicted fallen soldiers.  We also examine apocalyptic imagery and the recurrence of Armageddon themes, particularly with the British successfully taking the Holy Land in the Battle of Meggido.  Philip also explains that even though such religious depictions ran across all economic classes and were quite popular, political and church leaders tried at times to tamp it down for a variety of sensitivities.  For example, calling the war a “crusade” was seen as counter-productive in attempting to woo Muslim soldiers into fighting for the Allies. – See more at: http://www.researchonreligion.org/historical-topics/philip-jenkins-on-religion-world-war-i#sthash.PRt8P6Xg.dpuf
Our conversation then turns to the war itself and how religious language and imagery was used.  We look at the constant discussion of angels and “God’s guiding hand,” perhaps best represented by the story of the Angel of Mons and how that developed.  Philip points out how a major German offensive was named Operation Michael, after the biblical archangel.  The art of the time was replete with winged women or war heroes, as well as crucifixion scenes that depicted fallen soldiers.  We also examine apocalyptic imagery and the recurrence of Armageddon themes, particularly with the British successfully taking the Holy Land in the Battle of Meggido.  Philip also explains that even though such religious depictions ran across all economic classes and were quite popular, political and church leaders tried at times to tamp it down for a variety of sensitivities.  For example, calling the war a “crusade” was seen as counter-productive in attempting to woo Muslim soldiers into fighting for the Allies. – See more at: http://www.researchonreligion.org/historical-topics/philip-jenkins-on-religion-world-war-i#sthash.PRt8P6Xg.dpuf
Our conversation then turns to the war itself and how religious language and imagery was used.  We look at the constant discussion of angels and “God’s guiding hand,” perhaps best represented by the story of the Angel of Mons and how that developed.  Philip points out how a major German offensive was named Operation Michael, after the biblical archangel.  The art of the time was replete with winged women or war heroes, as well as crucifixion scenes that depicted fallen soldiers.  We also examine apocalyptic imagery and the recurrence of Armageddon themes, particularly with the British successfully taking the Holy Land in the Battle of Meggido.  Philip also explains that even though such religious depictions ran across all economic classes and were quite popular, political and church leaders tried at times to tamp it down for a variety of sensitivities.  For example, calling the war a “crusade” was seen as counter-productive in attempting to woo Muslim soldiers into fighting for the Allies. – See more at: http://www.researchonreligion.org/historical-topics/philip-jenkins-on-religion-world-war-i#sthash.PRt8P6Xg.dpuf

via Research On Religion | Philip Jenkins on Religion & World War I.

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  1. 20/08/2014 um 12:07

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